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Chief Big Foot Riders Return To Wounded Knee

Chief Big Foot Riders Return To Wounded Knee:
"We Want To Be Free"      
via Brenda Norrell
Wounded Knee, Lakota (formerly South Dakota) – Thirteen days and 287 miles ago, 44 people mounted horses and began the Memorial Chief Big Foot Ride in honor of Si Tanka (Chief Big Foot) and his unarmed band of Mniconjou and Hunkpapa refuges who were slaughtered by U.S. Calvary in 1890 at Wounded Knee.

But while these 44 riders began their journey under the shadow of U.S. Treaty, their numbers will swell to over 100 and end under the protection of a free and sovereign Lakota Nation.


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Hollywood's Historical Amnesia Highlights Holiday Releases

Amnesia at the Cineplex
by Lakshmi Chaudhry
"For all the pain and loss that The Kite Runner depicts, it is still a film of exhilarating, redemptive humanity, conveying an enduring sense of hope," gushed Ann Hornaday in her Washington Post review of the cinematic adaptation of Khaled Hosseini's literary blockbuster.
 
 
While other movie critics were less enthusiastic, almost all emphasized the "universal" appeal of a story of childhood friendship, betrayal and atonement, set against the backdrop of three decades of recent Afghan history.


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Preposterous Bushie Legal Arguments of 2007

The Ten Most Preposterous Bushie Legal Arguments of 2007
by Scott Horton
For legal commentators, the Bush White House and Justice Department are the gift that just keeps giving. Never before has such a torrent of inanities and absurdities gushed forth from official apertures.
 
It’s the sign of a government that truly disdains the rule of law, indeed, it hates law almost as much as it hates law enforcement and lawyers. Is anyone making the Herculean attempt to catalogue them all? 
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Musharraf, Machiavelli and the Future of Democracy

Pakistan: US, Musharraf and the Future of Democracy
by Ramzy Baroud
The 42-day drama in Pakistan is far from over; the declaration of emergency and the lifting of emergency are part of a charade, behind which lies a complex power play between Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf, various camps within the military elite, and the US government.
 
The Pakistani people are the least relevant to these calculations, although every player never fails to justify unwarranted actions in their name.

General Musharraf’s motives for declaring emergency on November 3 are far from enigmatic. To guarantee his political future, Musharraf acted in the decisive, uncompromising fashion of a military man: first he brought the country to a state of suspended animation, then he restructured the government, judiciary, parliament and constitution to align them with his interests.
 
 
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New China: Ang Lee's Cautionary Tale of Lust

Lust and Caution in China
by Peter Kwong
In China’s paternalistic society, all cultural programs are vetted for questionable content. Sex, violence, and immoral presentations are weeded out for fear that people would follow and act upon them -- and lead the country into chaos.
 
That is one reason only 20 foreign-made films per-year are allowed for screening in China -- and, of course, only after censors at the State Administration of Radio, Film and Television (SARFT) cut out footage they deem improper.
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Nuking Ontario: Standoff at Sharbot Lake

A Public Statement of Concern
by Dr. Gordon Edwards 
In the 1920’s radium sold for $100,000 per gram. By the 1940’s the market for radium had dried up. Too many people had died from bone cancer, anemia, leukemia and head cancers caused by microscopic quantities of radium.
 
The British Columbia Medical Association has described radium as “a superb carcinogen.”

Yet mining companies routinely discard large quantities of radium in their radioactive dumping grounds called uranium tailings piles. From there the radium can migrate into the food chain and the ground water over periods of thousands of years. Add a comment Add a comment Read more: Nuking Ontario: Standoff at Sharbot Lake

Iraq's Retrograde Progress in 2007

CHALLENGES 2007-2008: Iraq Progresses To Some of its Worst
by Dahr Jamail
Despite all the claims of improvements, 2007 has been the worst year yet in Iraq.

One of the first big moves this year was the launch of a troop "surge" by the U.S. government in mid-February. The goal was to improve security in Baghdad and the western al-Anbar province, the two most violent areas. By June, an additional 28,000 troops had been deployed to Iraq, bringing the total number up to more than 160,000.

By autumn, there were over 175,000 U.S. military personnel in Iraq. This is the highest number of U.S. troops deployed yet, and while the U.S. government continues to talk of withdrawing some, the numbers on the ground appear to contradict these promises.


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Canada's Afghanistan Mission: One Dead, Four Wounded in IED Attack

Canada's Afghanistan Mission: One Dead, Four Wounded in IED Attack
by C. L. Cook
The Canadian Broadcast Corporation is reporting today the death of another Canadian soldier in Afghanistan, bringing the official body count there to 74.
 
Jonathan Dion was a 27-year-old gunner from Val-d-Or, Que. (DND)
 
Jonathan Dion was killed early Sunday, when the Tracked Light Armour Vehicle (T-LAV) he was in was hit by an Improvised Explosive Device (IED). The blast wounded four other soldiers in the vehicle, all of them listed with "non-life threatening" injuries. 
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Not Alright, Jack: A State of the Union

Rancid "Progressivism": It's the State of the Union, Jack        
by Chris Floyd     
In 1977, at the height of the cold war, I interviewed the Charter 77 dissidents in Czechoslovakia, writes John Pilger. They warned that complacency and silence could destroy liberty and democracy as effectively as tanks.
 
"We're actually better off than you in the west," said a writer, measuring his irony. "Unlike you, we have no illusions."

John Pilger delivers a blistering state of the kingdom assessment of Great Britain after 10 years of New Labour's Clinton-style "humanitarian interventionism" and pro-business "centrism."
 
He finds a wasteland of shredded liberties, runaway inequality -- and the blood of tens of thousands of slaughtered innocents on the soft, well-manicured hands of the nation's "progressive" leaders.

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Suzy Orman and other Happy Pursuits

Channeling Suze Orman
by Norman Solomon
I was near the deadline for a column when I glanced at a TV screen. The Suze Orman Show, airing on CNBC at prime time, exerted a powerful force in my hotel room. And the fate of this column was sealed.
 
Orman made a big splash many years ago on public television — the incubating environment for her as a national phenom. With articulate calls for intelligent self-determination of one’s own financial future, she is a master of the long form. Humor and dramatic cadences punch up the impacts of her performances.

Seeing her the other night, within a matter of seconds, I realized that the jig was up. How could a mere underachieving syndicated columnist hope to withstand the blandishments and certainties of Suze Orman, bestselling author and revered eminence from the erudite bastions of PBS to the hard-boiled financial realms of General Electric’s CNBC?


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America's Toughest Housing Market: Tasers, Pepper Spray, and Arrests in Orleans

The Struggle for Affordable Housing in New Orleans
by Bill Quigley
In a remarkable symbol of the injustices of post-Katrina reconstruction, hundreds of people were locked out of a public New Orleans City Council meeting addressing demolition of 4,500 public housing apartments.
 
Demolition Man: HUD Secretary Alphonso Jackson has his own reasons for pressing ahead with the demolitions.
 
Some were tasered, many pepper sprayed, and a dozen arrested. Outside the chambers, iron gates were chained and padlocked even before the scheduled start.
 
The scene looked like one of those countries on TV that is undergoing a people's revolution -- and the similarities were only beginning.


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