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Loonie Protest Undeterred by Mint Threat

Mar 18, 2009 Press Release
Mint Backs Down by Dogwood Initiative…
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BP and the Big Lie

Jul 10, 2010 Riki Ott
BP, Governments Downplay Public Health…
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Justice Serve Thyself: The Supreme Perjurer

Oct 24, 2010 Robert Parry
A Perjurer on the Supreme Court by…
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Defending the Constitutional Right to Torture

System of a Down: Powers, Principalities and the Sacred Right to Torture        
by Chris Floyd     
At his Harper's blog, Scott Horton demonstrates how the architects of George W. Bush's filthy torture regimen are now holding positions that allow them to protect themselves and their masters from the legal consequences of their actions.

Marine Lt. Col. Stuart Crouch, a former military prosecutor, was due to testify to a Congressional subcommittee about the Administration's attempt to suppress evidence of torture in "Military Commission" trials of alleged terrorists. But at the last minute, he was blocked from testifying by the Pentagon's general counsel, William J. Haynes II, on specious grounds that Horton blows out of the water.


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Bringing the Occupation Home: Hillary and Guiliani Meet SODAPOP

GIULIANI AND CLINTON TASTE OCCUPATION IN IOWA
by Mike Ferner
A new campaign to place the Iraq war in the center of Iowa's presidential caucus races kicked off in Des Moines yesterday.
 
But as often happens, it wasn't so much the protest that made the story as the reaction to it.
 
 
 
photo Michael Gillespie
 
Chris Gaunt, 51 year-old Iowa farmer is
led to jail after peacefully "occupying"
Senator Hillary Clinton's Des Moines
campaign office to protest her support
of the Iraq war.

 
"Seasons Of Discontent--A Presidential Occupation Campaign," or SODAPOP as its organizers dubbed it, targeted the campaigns of Rudolph Giuliani and Hillary Clinton, taking over their offices in the Iowa state capital and disrupting both campaigns for several hours before a total of 19 people were arrested.
 
The "law and order" Giuliani campaign waited only about two hours to call on the suburban Clive, Iowa police to arrest 10 activists. The Clinton campaign appeared more reluctant to remove the protesters, waiting almost eight hours before requesting the Des Moines Police Department remove nine activists.
 
 
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Siegelman Update: The Curious Case of the Missing Transcript

Siegelman Updates
by Scott Horton
As we have often noted, absolutely nothing about the Siegelman case is “normal.”
 
Now we learn from the Associated Press notes that Governor Siegelman’s appeal to the Eleventh Circuit is being held up because there is no transcript.

The bulky transcript from the two-month-long trial has not been completed and must be available before attorneys for Siegelman and Scrushy can appeal the convictions to the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta. The delay was caused partly by the death earlier this year of Jimmy Dickens, the court reporter who recorded the trial, which included dozens of witnesses and mounds of physical evidence.

Siegelman and Scrushy have asked the appellate court to release them from prison while they are waiting for a final decision on the appeal — a decision Siegelman’s attorneys say might be a year or even two years away. Siegelman attorney Vince Kilborn said the delay in the appeal adds to his argument that the former governor should be out of prison while the sentence is appealed.

“I’m firmly convinced the 11th Circuit is going to reverse this case. The travesty is that we’ve got an innocent client sitting in federal prison with no hearing in sight on his appeal,” Kilborn said.


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Pelosi Goes with the Money

Pelosi Serves Big Money Over Workers -- and Democrats
by William Greider
In terms of economic consequences, the new trade agreement with Peru is trivial. In political terms, however, it delivers an ominous message. 
 
When faced with a choice between money and their own rank-and-file, the Democratic leaders in the House will go with the money, even if it requires them to pass legislation with Republican votes.
 
Even if a majority of their own caucus is opposed. Even if it means handing the shrinking president, George W. Bush, a rare legislative victory.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi pulled it off last week at considerable cost to her own reputation. How different are the new Democrats in Congress? Not very, it seems.
 
 
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Who's the Enemy?

In Iraq, It's Getting Harder to Find Any Bad Guys
by Robert Dreyfuss
Who is the enemy? Who, exactly, are we fighting in Iraq? Why are we there? And what's our objective?

Nearly five years into the war, the answers to basic questions like these ought to be obvious. In the Alice in Wonderland-like wilderness of mirrors that is Iraq, though, they're anything but.

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Passing: Norman Mailer RIP

Norman Mailer, 1923-2007
by John Nichols
There is much, much to be said about Norman Mailer, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author and world-class rabble-rouser who died Saturday at age 84.

But the pugilistic pensman would perhaps be most pleased to have it known that he went down swinging. He was chronicler of our politics and protests in the 1960s with two of the era's definitional books -- Armies of the Night (1968) and Miami and the Siege of Chicago (1968). He did not rest on his laurels -- though they were legion -- earned for exposing the dark undersides of the presidencies of Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon.



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Do Clothes Make the Man: General-President Musharraf

Our Man in Islamabad      
by Stephen Lendman
The Islamic Republic of Pakistan was established in August, 1947 when its majority Muslim population separated from British-controlled India and became a sovereign state. Since then, the country has been plagued by wars, political instability, and a series of military coups as it continues stumbling unsuccessfully toward democracy.

Nominally, Pakistan is a federal democratic republic (declared in 1956) under a semi-presidential system and bicameral legislature consisting of a 100 member Senate and larger lower house National Assembly.
 
The President is considered head of state and armed forces commander and chief, (in a civilian capacity) and is elected by the Electoral College of Pakistan comprised of both houses of Parliament and the Provincial Assemblies. The Prime Minister is Pakistan's head of government, is elected by the National Assembly, and is usually the largest party's leader.

This is how government is supposed to work in Pakistan, but things are never that simple there.
 
 
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Demanding the Return of the Disappeared: Lovinsky Pierre-Antoine

Join Danny Glover, Martin Sheen*, Ron Kovic* and others in a
24 Hour Fast for the safe return of Haitian human rights activist Lovinsky Pierre-Antoine
by Kevin Pina
Lovinsky Pierre-Antoine, the internationally respected Haitian human rights activist, disappeared in Haiti on the evening of 12 August, 2007. 
 
He is an extraordinary grassroots organizer beloved by his community, and a leading advocate for the poor, including street children, teenage mothers and victims of torture. 
 
Please urge the Brazilian government which plays a key role as head of the UN forces responsible for law and order in Haiti since the 2004 coup, as well as the governments of the US and Canada, (which are also key figures) to do all in their power, including making resources available to ensure Lovinsky’s immediate and safe release to his family and the community who need him.
 
Tuesday, Nov. 13 gather at 10:30am, outside the Brazilian Consulate on 8484 Wilhire Blvd (at La Cienega), Beverly Hills


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Impeachment Possible: Hearings in the Offing

Suddenly, Impeachment Hearings Are Looking Like a Strong Possibility
by Dave Lindorff
You wouldn’t know it if you just watch TV news or read the corporate press, but this past Tuesday, something remarkable happened.
 
Despite the pig-headed opposition of the Democratic Party’s top congressional leadership, a majority of the House, including three Republicans, voted to send Dennis Kucinich’s long sidelined Cheney impeachment bill (H Res 333) to the Judiciary Committee for hearings.

 
The vote was 218 to 194.


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Haiti's Media Under Fire

Gunshots Fired at Radio-Tele Ginen
by Wadner Pierre and Joe Emersberger
Gunshots were fired at Radio-Tele Ginen (RTG) during the morning of Tuesday, November 6, in Haiti's capital Port-au-Prince. The attack injured a female street vendor who was subsequently hospitalized according to RTG employees.
 
A front-side window of one of RTG's yellow jeeps lay
shattered on asphalt in front of the station. photo - Wadner Pierre

RTG is popular with both rich and poor in Haiti. The broadcaster is respected in poor neighborhoods because it often gave a voice to the residents of Lavalas strongholds while the de facto government of 2004-2006 was in power.


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Iraq: Spun Numbers Don't Equal Security

Fewer Deaths Bring No Reassurance
by Ali al-Fadhily
Despite claims by Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki and Bush administration officials that violence in Iraq is decreasing, residents in the capital tell a different story.

Attacks by Iraqi resistance groups against the U.S. military continue in Baghdad and Iraq's al-Anbar province, despite U.S. military support for certain Sunni militias in the areas.

According to the U.S. Department of Defence, 18 U.S. soldiers were killed in Baghdad and al-Anbar in October. In all 39 U.S. soldiers were reported killed in Iraq for the month, making it the lowest monthly total since March 2006.


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