Main Menu

Minding Your R2P's

Share this post...

Submit to DiggSubmit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
An Inadequate R2P: Update
by Anthony Fenton                                                     
Recall that a year ago (happy anniversary!) I kicked off the Web of Democracy with a few posts about the humanitarian imperialist doctrine that Canada helped create, the Responsibility to Protect (R2P). A year later, R2P's well- (and predominantly Western-) funded advocates continue to try and 'operationalize' the doctrine (ie. make it hegemonic).  In May, the Obama administration encouraged such efforts by endorsing R2P in itsNational Security Strategy (.pdf, p. 48)

I've just finished reading one of the best critiques of R2P to date, Edward S. Herman & David Peterson's The Politics of Genocide (reviewed favorably here and here, & not so favorably but rebutted, here), and encourage you to do the same some weekend. I'll do my best to review it before the end of the summer. 

Now, to the reason for today's post. Although the 'R2P lobby' has been undeterred by legitimate critiques (which they also refuse to engage), those critiques continue to be voiced. Most recently, during yesterday's UN Security Council 'debate on civilian protection,' here's what Venezuelan ambassador to the UN, Jorge Valero, voicing the concerns of many, had to say:

"emphasizing the primary responsibility of protecting civilians during armed conflict, [Valero] said human right violation[s] should be condemned in all circumstances.  The principles of consent of the parties concerned, impartiality, and non-use of force except in self-defence…
 
 




   

Share this post...

Submit to DiggSubmit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn

Bottommenu